Red flag symptoms can include:

Smelly ears
Constant ear scratching or head shaking
Avoiding having ear or head touched
Rubbing ears on the carpet
Pain or swelling in or around the ear
Discharge from the ear – black, brown, or yellow, might be sticky or gooey
If you see any of these signs, hold off on the ear cleaning and call your vet for an appointment instead, as your pup may have an infection or ear parasites.

Getting a Good Clean

With your pooch in a standing or sitting position, pour a small amount of ear cleaner onto a cotton ball and gently wipe out the inside of the ear.

Don’t ever stick your finger (or any other object) into the actual ear canal (including q-tips!) – you can do some serious damage.

Then, squirt a little bit of cleaner right down into the ear canal and massage the base of your pup’s ear gently. What this does is help to break down the wax at the bottom of the ear canal.

Let your dog shake his head, and then wipe out the excess liquid and ear ‘gunk’ with a dry cotton ball. It’s that easy!

Some of our tail-wagging pals may need some extra ear care on top of routine cleanings, too.

Dogs with droopy ears, long-standing allergies, chronic ear infections or skin problems, and avid swimmers may need special cleaning solutions, as well as ear checks and cleanup more frequently.

Applying a small amount of drying ear cleaner into your pup’s ears before and after baths can help to prevent infection too, as can having extra ear hair removed by a professional groomer when needed.

Taking just a few minutes every week to care for your best friend’s ears can make a significant diffe